Assignments for novice skaters

Assignments divided into:

Movement technical facets

rhythm

Timing

 

Balance

 

Skating to each other

After 10 strokes of skating, you slip with your knees bent and try to make your skates touch each other. Skate another 10 strokes and try again.

 

Glide on one leg

It is as simple as this command sounds. You ask your students nothing more than to slide on one leg. Giving a good example is usually enough.

Variations at Glide on 1 leg

Every 3rd, 4th etc. slide longer. Even is one leg, odd is the other. This exercise speaks for itself.

If you still want to add something extra, you can always do so: By means of rhythm changes, you can have your students say, for example, 'short, short, long, short, short, long'.

Glide on two legs, lift one skate

Series. You first let your students slide on two legs, without further instructions. Then, if necessary, continue sliding on two legs, but this time with the ankles straight. Then ask to slide the feet closer together. If this works reasonably well, ask to lift one foot. Here you have a small series of assignments, which add up to only one exercise.

Keep torso and upper body stable and compact

Have the skaters in your group practice not to turn their shoulders while skating, but to keep still.

 

Posture/position joints

Hands at navel
Try to skate with your knees constantly bent. Always keep your hands against/near your navel as much as possible.

Skate with your hands behind your knees. Always one leg at a time on the ice.

Don't see toes

Stand on two legs and press your knees forward. If you look down, you may not see your toes anymore. Some students have a tendency to fall backwards as soon as they get down on their knees. This means that they push the knees too little forward. It often helps to practice this separately with a little support. It does not matter if the student is more on the front foot.

Deep is relaxation

Deep sitting is also relaxation. If you relax your leg muscles, you will automatically fall down. You just have to make sure you don't sink further down when you're as deep as you want. Try standing still first, then skating as well.

 

wet mop

Try skating with just enough tension in your body to make sure you can hold that deep skate seat. Furthermore, you are a limp doll or a wet mop, whichever appeals to you more.

 

Relax your arm

Try skating with just enough tension in your body to make sure you can hold that deep skate seat. Furthermore, you are a limp doll or a wet mop, whichever appeals to you more.

 

Top edge of boarding

Try to encourage your students to carry out their exercises or assignments in such a way that they are lower than the top edge of the green boarding.

 

table tennis ball

Try to 'clamp' a table tennis ball in your navel, it should not fall out while skating.

 

Compact ball

Try to think of your body as a solid compact ball. Fold your hands together and press them against your stomach. Now curl yourself around this 'center', with your upper body as well as your thighs.

Frequency

Switch in frequency

Skate part of the track (straight or semi-straight) with the fastest/shortest steps possible and the other part with the longest possible strokes.

In the bend: Drive a bend with as many transfers/steps as possible. The result is that the placement is better.

Assignments divided into:

Different phases/parts of the skating stroke

sales

Weight shift, not lifting anything

Stand with both skates slightly wider than hip-width apart and with your knees bent. Make sure both skates have some grip by letting your ankles sink in slightly. Have your skates pointing straight ahead. Now shift your weight from right to left without lifting a skate.

 

Oh god!

Timing is about waiting for the right moment for a certain action. With skating that means: 'Waiting for the right moment for your take-off and bet'. The right time is when you feel that you are already falling into your next stroke. Just wait… and push!; Hold back… and place! Replace the words with 'one push'.

 

Slightly drop

Always try to sag a little before you take off. The sag can give just that little bit of relaxation, making the push-off more explosive and powerful. What you have to be careful of is that your students do not apply this too excessively in their stroke. You want the relaxation, but not the 'real' extra collapse.

 

Hanging inside

Try to make your strokes so that you hang in as much as possible before placing your other skate on the ice. With your whole standing leg, not just your ankle.

Timing: To get into your new stroke, you first have to let yourself fall to the side and only at the last moment, during your take-off, put your skate on the ice under you. To ensure that the timing is right, the skate that has to go to the ice must still be behind during the fall and only accelerate to the ice at the last moment.

 

Between the rails

Try skating as if you were driving between railroad tracks. You use the rails to push off against.

There are countless variations on this exercise: the 'Limburg road', the 'Bobsleigh track', the 'mopped hallway'. Because these variations are based on the total movement, they often work better with moderately advanced middle groups than with lower groups. In lower groups there are often still so many disruptive factors in the movement that such a feeling of the skating movement cannot yet be felt.

 

Bijhaal

Horizontal

After push-off, bend the knee of the loosened leg. The lower leg should now hang (almost) horizontally. Make sure that the foot remains relaxed pointing downwards (or slightly forward if necessary). Comments such as "I want to see the cleat on your skate" carry a high risk of pulling the toes back.

The ankle should always remain as relaxed as possible when lifting the foot. As an instructor, you must always be careful with these kinds of didactic remarks and always react alertly when you see movements that you do not want.

Hands on your knees

Put both hands on your knees. Now force with your hands that your catch knee goes to the right place.

tap buttocks

Try tapping your buttocks with the heel of your skate immediately after your take-off. Make sure that the knee of the raised leg continues to point downwards.

tap heel

Tap the toes of the lifted leg against the inside of the heel of your sliding leg. Pull up the toes of the loose foot slightly, so that the skate can then easily be brought to the ice in one movement.

 

Placement

Place in a V

Always place your skates at an angle to the other skate (v-shaped).

below your navel

You should actually place the skate right under your belly button and right under your head. Keep your hands firmly against your navel and before you put down a skate, look at your hands first. While looking at your hands, place your skate under your hands on the ice. That is the place where it belongs, for many people that is a different place than they thought.

mirror

With wet ice and covered skies, the ice floor is a large mirror. To place below you is to place exactly in your reflection. A potential danger of this exercise is that your students will turn their push-off outwards. It is then much easier to place your new skate under you. A follow-up could be to place your left skate at the height of your right shoulder and the right at the height of the left.

Same direction as your body

Try to make each stroke so that your skate slides in the same direction that you move your body. Be careful not to let your students steer with their shoulders.

Hold back… and place!

Timing is about waiting for the right moment for a certain action. With skating that means: 'Waiting for the right moment for your take-off and bet'. The right time is when you feel that you are already falling into your next stroke. Just wait… and push!; Hold back… and place!

2-size

Make 2 numbers. Always let one person practice and the other act as a support (not a lean). The exerciser tries to slide straight on the leg closest to the supporter. If this succeeds, the next step is to try to slide straight and then tilt the skate slightly outwards (keep in mind that the skate will then steer slightly).

 

Sliding/cutting/steering